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Tag Archives: iphone

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Posted by on December 28, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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MICROSOFT GOES TOUCH

With Friday’s release of the touch-centric Windows 8 software, Microsoft continues more than three decades of making operating systems for personal computers.

Microsoft Corp. got its start on PCs in 1981 through a partnership with IBM Corp. Microsoft made the software that ran IBM’s hardware, and later machines made by other manufacturers. That first operating system was called MS-DOS — for Microsoft Disk Operating System. It required people to type instructions to complete tasks such as running programs and deleting files.

It wasn’t until 1985 that Microsoft released its first graphical user interface, which allowed people to perform tasks by moving a mouse and clicking on icons on the screen. Microsoft called the operating system Windows.

Windows 1.0 came out in November 1985, nearly two years after Apple began selling its first Macintosh computer, which also used a graphical operating system. Apple sued Microsoft in 1988 for copyright infringement, claiming that Microsoft copied the “look and feel” of its operating system. Apple lost.

Microsoft followed it with Windows 2.0 in December 1987, 3.0 in May 1990 and 3.1 in April 1992.

In July 1993, Microsoft released Windows NT, a more robust operating system built from scratch. It was meant as a complement to Windows 3.1 and allowed higher-end machines to perform more complex tasks, particularly for engineering and scientific programs that dealt with large numbers.

Microsoft had its first big Windows launch with the release of Windows 95 in August 1995. The company placed special sections in newspapers, ran television ads with the Rolling Stones song “Start Me Up” and paid to have the Empire State Building lit up in Windows colors.

Comedian Jay Leno joined co-founder Bill Gates on stage at a launch event at the company’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash.

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“Windows 95 is so easy, even a talk-show host can figure it out,” Gates joked.

The hype worked: Computer users lined up to be the first to buy it. Microsoft sold millions of copies within the first few weeks. Windows 95 brought built-in Internet support and “plug and play” tools to make it easier to install software and attach hardware. Windows 95 was far better — and more successful — than its predecessor and narrowed the ease-of-use gap between Windows and Mac computers.

At around the same time, Microsoft released the first version of its Internet Explorer browser. It went on to tie IE and Windows functions so tightly that many people simply used the browser over the once-dominant Netscape Navigator. The U.S. Justice Department and several states ultimately sued Microsoft, accusing it of using its monopoly control over Windows to shut out competitors in other markets. The company fought the charges for years before settling in 2002.

The June 1998 release of Windows 98 was more low-key than the Windows 95 launch, though Microsoft denied it had anything to do with the antitrust case.

Windows 98 had the distinction of being the last with roots to the original operating system, MS-DOS. Each operating system is made up of millions of lines of instructions, or code, written in sections by programmers. Each time there’s an update, portions get dropped or rewritten, and new sections get added for new features. Eventually, there’s nothing left from the original.

Microsoft came out with Windows Me a few years later, the last to use the code from Windows 95. Starting with Windows 2000, Microsoft worked off the code built for NT, the 1993 system built from scratch.

The biggest release since Windows 95 came in October 2001, when Microsoft launched Windows XP at a hotel in New York’s Times Square. Windows XP had better Internet tools, including built-in wireless networking support. It had improvements in media software for listening to and recording music, playing videos and editing and organizing digital photographs.

Microsoft’s next major release didn’t come until Vista in November 2006. Businesses got it first, followed by a broader launch to consumers in January 2007. Coming after years of virus attacks targeting Windows machines and spread over the Internet, the long-delayed Vista operating system offered stronger security and protection. It also had built-in parental-controls settings.

But many people found Vista slow and incompatible with existing programs and devices. Microsoft launched Windows 7 in October 2009 with fixes to many of Vista’s flaws.

Windows 7 also disrupted users less often by displaying fewer pop-up boxes, notifications and warnings — allowing those that do appear to stand out. Instead, many of those messages get stashed in a single place for people to address when it’s convenient.

In a sign of what’s to come, Windows 7 was able to sense when someone is using more than one finger on a touchpad or touch screen, so people can spread their fingers to zoom into a picture, for instance, just as they can on the iPhone.

Apple released its first iPhone in 2007 and the iPad in 2010. Devices running Google’s Android system for mobile devices also caught on. As a result, sales of Windows computers slowed down. Consumers were delaying upgrades and spending their money on new smartphones and tablet computers instead.

Windows 8 and its sibling, Windows RT, represent Microsoft’s attempt to address that. The new software is designed to make desktop and laptop computers work more like tablets.

Windows 8 ditches the familiar start menu on the lower left corner and forces people to swipe the edges of the screen to access various settings. It sports a new screen filled with a colorful array of tiles, each leading to a different application, task or collection of files. Windows 8 is designed especially for touch screens, though it will work with the mouse and keyboard shortcuts, too.

 

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Microsoft and PC makers alike have been looking to Windows 8 to resurrect sales. The campaign to promote it is of the caliber given for Windows 95 and XP.

But Apple is releasing two new iPads, Amazon.com Inc. is shipping full-sized Kindle Fire tablets and Barnes & Noble Inc. is refreshing its Nook tablet line next month. Microsoft and its allies will face competition that is far more intense than in the heyday of Windows 95 and XP.

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Apple launches new iPad mini

APPLE have launched their eagerly awaited iPad Mini, which will be available next month.

The tablet, which can be held in one hand, is 7.2mm thick and weighs 0.68lbs. Its arrival was announced at an event in California.

In the US, it will cost $329 (£206) for the wifi-only 16GB model and will be available on November 2.

The iPad Mini will compete directly with similar sized tablets from Google and Amazon.

In 2010, late founder Steve Jobs described such tablets as being “too small”.

But pressure from competitors appears to have forced a change of heart. Amazon’s new 7in Kindle Fire HD costs $199 (£159 in the UK). And Google’s Nexus 7 has a price tag of $250 (£159).

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Posted by on October 24, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Samsung complaints “Apple’s new iPhone 5 violates its patents”

Newest Apple smartphone will be drawn into legal battle in California courts

Apple’s new iPhone 5 has been drawn into the patent battle under way between the company and Samsung in US courts.

 

Samsung Electronics announced on Sept. 20 that it submitted a document to the San Jose Divisional Office of the California Northern District Court the previous day stating that it considers the new model to violate its own patents and plans to add it to its previously filed suit.

As a next step, it plans to present a document detailing the specific patent infringements after examining the detailed product specifications and services.

The previous suit the company referred to was filed in April over the iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, the third generation iPad, and the iPad2. Samsung Electronics is claiming that Apple products and services violated two standard patents and six commercial patents that it owns. But since the iPhone 5 has yet to have an official release, it is still unknown just which of the eight patents Samsung believes the product violated. What is known is that it does not include Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology, which was the focus of particular industry attention among the eight patents at issue in the suit.

An official with the company called the decision “inevitable.”

 

“We prefer market competition based on innovation to lawsuits, but we made the decision that we had to respond in some way to protect continued innovations and intellectual property rights at a time when Apple is limiting market competition with lawsuits,” the official said.

 

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Adobe no more supports mobile Flash

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Did Apple kill Adobe’s mobile Flash? That is the question many asked this week after Adobe announced that it would end development of Flash for mobile devices.
Many observers were not surprised by the announcement, which came a day after the company announced it would cut 750 jobs.

Don Reisinger of eWeek compiled a list of reasons why Adobe lost the mobile Flash battle, which identified the resistance from Apple and the success of iPhones and iPads as the main reasons.

The Guardian said that with the news, it was Steve Jobs who had had “the last laugh”.

Elsewhere, Jason Perlow of ZDNet’s Tech Broiler blog argued that without a focus on the rising mobile market, Adobe Flash is “irrelevant”.

PCWorld’s Daniel Ionescu asked if “anybody will miss Flash on their mobiles?” and pointed out that “iOS users have been living Flash-free for more than three years”.

Still, some saw Adobe’s move as a step in the right direction. Matt Peckham of Time’s Techland wrote that it takes “guts to do the right thing”.

“Adobe deserves our plaudits, for doing something I’d wager Steve Jobs never would have (whatever his claims about the web), had Cupertino been the proprietor of Flash and not the folks from San Jose,” Peckham added.

But for Bill Ray of the Register, the announcement shows where Adobe plans to head with its future developments of HTML5 tools.

He wrote: “This announcement has much more to do with Adobe seeing that there’s no future in selling tools for streaming video, but there is a decent future in selling tools to create, and control, digital content.”

 
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Posted by on November 13, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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Difference between 2g and 3g iphone

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Posted by on April 8, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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