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Jelly Bean on the Samsung Galaxy S III

When Google unveiled Android 4.1 Jelly Bean at Google I/O a couple of months back as the latest version of its Android operating system, Samsung was one of the first OEMs to take center stage and make public its Jelly Bean plans for the devices in its portfolio. During its announcement, the Korean electronics giant confirmed that the Samsung Galaxy S III would be the first Samsung handset to get a taste of Jelly Bean. The manufacturer however did not release any specific timeframe as to when exactly this will happen.

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A couple of weeks back, we already saw the Android 4.1 Jelly Bean update land on the Samsung Galaxy S III in Poland followed by a couple the Korean version of the handset. In addition to that, the update also made its way to handsets in some of the countries in the European continent. Today, Jelly Bean has landed on the unlocked version of the Samsung Galaxy S III in the UK after it hit several carrier-branded versions of the handset last week.

If you happen to be a loyal subject of the Queen living across the pond and rock a BTU (British unlocked) variant of the Samsung Galaxy S III, you will definitely be interested to know that the Android 4.1 Jelly Bean update is now being rolled out via OTA or Samsung Kies for your handset.

 

 

The Jelly Bean update weighs in at approximately 284 MB and aside from cranking up the Samsung flagship device to the latest version of the Android mobile operating system, the software update will also bring a couple of enhancements and new features to TouchWIZ, the custom user interface overlaid atop the Android OS of the handset. These features include a blocking mode for better control over your notifications along with a new “Easy Mode” for the handset’s home screen launcher. Of course, you also get Jelly Bean-specific features such as the new Google Search app with Google Now along with improvements to the performance of the handset courtesy of Google’s Project Butter.

Eligible for an upgrade? Check your eligibility here!

If the notification still hasn’t showed up, you also have the option of manually checking for the update by going to Settings > About device > Software update and hope that it comes back with something tangible.

As for the handset, the Samsung Galaxy S III is the Korean electronics giant’s gold mine after selling 20 million units of the device in just one hundred days after the handset made its debut in the shelves back in August. The handset packs a QualComm MSM8960 SnapDragon chipset under the hood which comes with a dual-core Krait processor clocked at 1.5 GHz along with a staggering 2 GB of RAM. Storage space on the handset ranges from16GB to as much as 64GB while its display on the other hand is a massive 4.8-inch SuperAMOLED HD panel made from Gorilla Glass 2 with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. The camera department of the handset is also remarkable with its rear 8MP shooter and front 1.9MP snapper.

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Posted by on October 25, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Apple launches new iPad mini

APPLE have launched their eagerly awaited iPad Mini, which will be available next month.

The tablet, which can be held in one hand, is 7.2mm thick and weighs 0.68lbs. Its arrival was announced at an event in California.

In the US, it will cost $329 (£206) for the wifi-only 16GB model and will be available on November 2.

The iPad Mini will compete directly with similar sized tablets from Google and Amazon.

In 2010, late founder Steve Jobs described such tablets as being “too small”.

But pressure from competitors appears to have forced a change of heart. Amazon’s new 7in Kindle Fire HD costs $199 (£159 in the UK). And Google’s Nexus 7 has a price tag of $250 (£159).

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Posted by on October 24, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Pakistan Starts in Style …ICC World Cup 2012

Mohammad Hafeez and Nasir Jamshed cashed in on a below-par performance from New Zealand in the field, putting together an impressive partnership during which their timing and apparent effortlessness in building on an aggressive opening stand stood out. The depth and variety in Pakistan’s bowling, Hafeez’s miserly spell and New Zealand’s questionable tactics in the chase combined to put a target of 178 beyond reach, producing a winning start to Pakistan’s tournament.

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New Zealand had their chances. Hafeez decided to give his inconsistent batting the first go under sunny skies but in conditions where bowlers had assistance. Kyle Mills found early swing and should have had an initially-tentative Hafeez third ball, but Ross Taylor fluffed a straightforward chance at slip. Having dropped his Pakistan counterpart, the New Zealand captain was left flapping his lips when Hafeez launched Daniel Vettori for a six over long-on the next over.

Imran Nazir looked the more assured of the openers, using the depth of the crease well to dispatch Mills’ two short deliveries for boundaries on either side of the ground, and continuing the treatment against Jacob Oram’s half-trackers. Nazir fell in the last over of the Powerplay, caught and bowled by Tim Southee, but by then Hafeez had got into his groove with a couple of flowing drives and was about to be joined by a partner who wasted no time in keeping the momentum intact.

Tall, well-built and powerful, Jamshed was nowhere near brutal in his style of play. He didn’t have to rely on sheer power to achieve what timing, placement and a sound technique did. Against Nathan McCullum‘s round-the-wicket line, he drove inside out, lofting the ball in the vacant space behind extra cover and clearing the ropes twice. He was equally wristy, clipping the ball square and through midwicket and slicing Mills over point for four. Mills was again unlucky, as a perfectly-positioned Rob Nicol at deep square leg spilled a chance off Jamshed, making matters worse by palming the ball for six when the batsman was on 42.

As Jamshed attacked at one end, Hafeez was content to rotate the strike, collecting runs down the ground, jabbing, steering and nudging the ball around for singles and even bludgeoning Nathan McCullum for six over midwicket. He was bowled trying to pull James Franklin in his first over but the 76-run stand with Jamshed had set an excellent launching pad.

New Zealand, though, pulled things back, dismissing Kamran Akmal and Jamshed in successive overs that yielded just 10. But Umar Akmal and the rest counterattacked in the last four. Even though Southee conceded just three in the 18th over, with third man and fine leg inside the circle, a generous dose of length, and misdirected, deliveries helped Umar Akmal, Shahid Afridi and Shoaib Malik score 42 in the last four.

New Zealand opened with Kane Williamson, a solid but less-attacking option, and played Vettori, busy, accumulative but not renowned as a big hitter, at No.3. The batting order suggested a strategy that relied heavily on the ammunition in the middle order to lead the surge in the late overs. Though that surge did come, and gave Pakistan plenty of anxious moments, it arrived at a time when the required-rate had reached 14 an over and, in hindsight, a touch too late.

Williamson made 15 in 13 but he had a fluent Rob Nicol at the other end. Nicol showed early intent, charging out to Sohail Tanvir and smacking him over long-on, and going over the top against Yasir Arafat with mid-off inside the circle. Pakistan bowled just one over of spin – from Hafeez, who conceded just 15 in his four-over spell – inside the Powerplay, and their slow bowlers stifled the innings once the field spread out.

Afridi mixed it up well and even found turn but Nicol was dislodged while attempting to cut one that went on straight. Williamson was run out shortly after, and the five overs after the Powerplay produced just 26 runs, with Vettori and Brendon McCullum at the crease. Saeed Ajmal’s first over ended the deadlock with Brendon McCullum, who reverse-swept, stepped out and also cut well, picking him for boundaries. But with the asking rate climbing, the wickets came, Ajmal dismissing Vettori for 18 off 16 and Umar Gul yorking Brendon McCullum, who left his team with 70 needed off 29 balls. By then, Hafeez had completed his spell, with his first three overs only going for five runs.

It was too much to get in the end, despite Oram and Franklin’s quick cameos and Taylor’s assault of three fours in a row against Gul that brought down the equation to 22 off 9 balls. He was run-out brilliantly, courtesy a flat throw to the striker’s end from the deep from Umar Akmal next ball, and the biggest threat in Pakistan’s way, at that point, was eliminated.

 
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Posted by on September 23, 2012 in CRICKET

 

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Samsung complaints “Apple’s new iPhone 5 violates its patents”

Newest Apple smartphone will be drawn into legal battle in California courts

Apple’s new iPhone 5 has been drawn into the patent battle under way between the company and Samsung in US courts.

 

Samsung Electronics announced on Sept. 20 that it submitted a document to the San Jose Divisional Office of the California Northern District Court the previous day stating that it considers the new model to violate its own patents and plans to add it to its previously filed suit.

As a next step, it plans to present a document detailing the specific patent infringements after examining the detailed product specifications and services.

The previous suit the company referred to was filed in April over the iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, the third generation iPad, and the iPad2. Samsung Electronics is claiming that Apple products and services violated two standard patents and six commercial patents that it owns. But since the iPhone 5 has yet to have an official release, it is still unknown just which of the eight patents Samsung believes the product violated. What is known is that it does not include Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology, which was the focus of particular industry attention among the eight patents at issue in the suit.

An official with the company called the decision “inevitable.”

 

“We prefer market competition based on innovation to lawsuits, but we made the decision that we had to respond in some way to protect continued innovations and intellectual property rights at a time when Apple is limiting market competition with lawsuits,” the official said.

 

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Pakistan Vs India T 20 …………..More than a practice Match

Arch-rivals India and Pakistan will get an early chance to size up each other ahead of the World Twenty20 when they clash in a high-profile practice match in Colombo next Monday. The match, part of the warm-up schedule drawn up by the International Cricket Council, is the only one of 12 practice games that will be beamed live by the host broadcasters.

Pakistan captain Mohammad Hafeez welcomed the chance to play against India before the tournament starts on Tuesday. “It is usually a high-pressure game and good for us to experience it early,” Hafeez told reporters in Colombo on Wednesday night. India coach Duncan Fletcher said his team’s two warm-up matches — the other is against host Sri Lanka on Saturday — will be important preparations for the main event. “We have come here with the belief that we can win the World Twenty20 and it is crucial we get attuned to the conditions,” Fletcher said. “We have obviously got a good build-up. “We look forward to the two warm-up games which will give us the preparation we require for the tournament.” India and Pakistan have been drawn in separate groups for the preliminary league, but will meet in the Super Eights round in Colombo on September 30 if the seeding go to plan.

 
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Posted by on September 16, 2012 in CRICKET

 

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Aussies Bamboozled by Doosra

Ajmal has troubled the Aussies on the spin-friendly wickets in the United Arab Emirates and could lead Pakistan to a series victory in Sharjah on Monday.
The off-spinner claimed 4-32 as Pakistan levelled the series with a seven-wicket win in Abu Dhabi.
Ajmal has been a constant threat against Michael Clarke‘s men, taking seven wickets at a stunning average of 8.85 and an economy rate of 3.10 runs per over.
Pakistan legend Wasim Akram believes the Australians have been unable to pick Ajmal’s doosra and veteran Michael Hussey said the 34-year-old had been the key in the series so far.
“The more you face him, the more you can read him,” Hussey said.
“We’ve got to try to play him better because he’s certainly the one who’s been the difference so far in the two teams.”
The Hussey brothers – Michael and David – have been dismissed by Ajmal in both matches, while Glenn Maxwell has also fallen to the spinner twice.
Clarke has continued to be Australia’s most impressive batsman, scoring 103 runs in the series with a top score of 66 in the opening game.
But the captain remains without a century in his past seven ODI innings despite passing 50 on three occasions.
David Warner averages 35.6 in ODIs this year but has scored just 29 runs in the opening two matches, while opening partner Matthew Wade has managed just 17 this series.
Wade remains without a ton in his 23 innings at ODI level and has three single digit scores in his past six, leaving plenty of room for improvement.
Pakistan have also had their issues with the bat but had Nasir Jamshed (97 in game two) stand up when they needed him to in Abu Dhabi.
Australia have enjoyed strong displays from pace duo Mitchell Starc (five wickets at 17) and James Pattinson (four at 16.25), but Starc is under an injury cloud after complaining of a side/chest injury during the second ODI.
While Clarke’s bowlers have done a solid job, the batsmen must improve and being able to deal with Ajmal would go a long way towards sealing a series win.
 
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Posted by on September 2, 2012 in CRICKET

 

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Windows Redesign A Problem For Microsoft Users

As Microsoft Corp prepares to show the world what its new Windows 8 can do on the next generation of high-powered tablets, initial reviews of the new operating system on existing hardware underscore the challenges the company faces with the radical redesign of its flagship product.

The world’s largest software company says millions of people are already using a downloaded pre-release version of Windows 8 on PCs, laptops and touch-devices ahead of its full introduction this autumn. At a media event in Los Angeles on Monday, the company is expected to discuss its plans to take on Apple Inc’s all-conquering iPad this holiday shopping season.

So far, most reviewers have praised the look and feel of the touch-friendly “Metro” style of Windows 8, which is based on colorful squares, or “tiles,” that depict applications such as email, and update in real time. But they have also stressed how difficult it will be for users to move away from what they know and trust.

“It’s a bit of a struggle for people who are deliberately oriented on a PC, that are used to a mouse feel,” said former Microsoft strategist Al Hilwa.

Now an analyst at tech research firm IDC, Hilwa has been trying out the latest demo release for two weeks. “Without a touchscreen, I struggled with a mouse to do certain things,” he said.

The new Metro interface only runs programs written for it, so users have to switch back to the traditional desktop to do certain tasks, like listening to music on Apple’s iTunes.

“The thing that really infuriates me is that it seems like Metro apps, and apps running in the normal desktop don’t have any knowledge of each other, ” said Forrester Research analyst David Johnson. “There’s no easy way to navigate between them, and I’m not quite sure why that is.”

The latest test version is not yet finished software. And outside of a few industry testers, no one has tried out Windows 8 on a tablet powered by ultra-efficient ARM Holdings chips, which is the closest Microsoft will come to challenging the iPad.

Microsoft is expected to say more about that on Monday, and there is talk that it might introduce a tablet under its own brand name. The company declined to comment on the reaction to the new system and its plans for the Monday event.

Nevertheless, Microsoft has not persuaded some of its most loyal users just yet.

“Right now, I’m not sold,” said analyst Michael Cherry of Directions on Microsoft, an independent research firm that focuses on the tech giant.

Cherry said he had persevered with Windows 8 for a few days, but had problems setting up email on his test machine. “I can’t rely on it as a production tool,” he said. “I can’t switch over yet. At this point, I should be able to leave Windows 7 behind.”

A former Microsoft program manager, Cherry worries that the initial complexity of the new system will prevent it from being an instant hit, like its predecessor, Windows 7.

“If a guy who has used Windows since Windows 1.0 can’t figure it out, then I’m going to guess there are other people out there who aren’t going to figure it out,” he said. “We won’t see line-ups at Best Buy at midnight. I’d love to see that, but it’s just not there.”

Mainstream tech reviewers like the Wall Street Journal’s Walt Mossberg or the New York Times’ David Pogue have not yet weighed in on the third and latest “preview” of Windows 8, which became publicly available online on May 31.

The smattering of reviews on tech-centric blogs have generally praised the new look of Windows 8, but almost every one has stressed how difficult users will find the switch.

“I’ve felt almost totally at sea – confused, paralyzed, angry, and ultimately resigned to the pain of having to alter the way I do most of my work,” wrote Farhad Manjoo, technology columnist at online journal Slate, even as he acknowledged that there is a lot to love about Windows 8.

GeekWire — Microsoft’s hometown technology news website in Seattle — was no kinder, featuring a video of one reader’s father, completely stumped by how to get back to the Start menu. ( http://www.geekwire.com/2012/real-user-windows-8-they-drive-mac/ )

“Bottom line, I’ve spent the past day feeling lost, and a little grumpy,” wrote GeekWire’s Todd Bishop, who has followed the software company as a reporter for more than a decade.

“Microsoft likes to use the words ‘fast and fluid’ to describe Windows 8, but two other words keep popping to my mind: ‘New Coke,'” wrote Bishop, referring to Coca-Cola Co’s short-lived attempt to reinvent its core product in the 1980s.

Gizmodo reviewer Mat Honan praised Windows 8’s “subtle elegance” and said the Metro apps were better and easier to navigate than the last test version, but added there was nothing that “bowls you over.”

ZDNet reviewer Ed Bott, a previous skeptic of Windows 8, liked the “rich and polished collection of Metro-style apps,” and was the only high-profile reviewer with a wholly positive reaction.

To be sure, any great change to a system used by more than 1 billion people every day is bound to meet with resistance.

Microsoft’s Vista operating system got off to a terrible start in early 2007 due to its heavy memory demands and finicky security settings, but recovered somewhat in later updates. Almost three years later, its successor, Windows 7, became the company’s fastest-selling system to date, and has now racked up more than 500 million sales.

But Apple’s intuitive iOS mobile system has raised expectations, both for aesthetics and ease of use.

“I would not be able to give my mother – who is 76 – Windows 8 and expect her to be productive with it,” said Forrester’s Johnson. “But I’m also not sure that somebody in their 30s, or even 20s, wouldn’t be confused initially by the Metro interface either.”

Individual consumers and potential iPad buyers, rather than corporate customers, are the primary target for the Windows 8. Many big companies are still in the process of spending millions of dollars upgrading to Windows 7.

The success of the software will depend in part on the quality and price of machines running Windows 8, which is in the hands of PC makers such as Hewlett-Packard Co, Samsung Electronics, Lenovo Group and Acer Inc .

But even if the machines are slick, Microsoft’s online Windows Store is still no match for Apple’s App Store, and will probably take several years to build momentum, which in turn removes incentives to buy tablets running the new Windows.

“I really want to use Windows 8,” said Cherry of Directions on Microsoft. “But I’m not sure they’ve gotten to nirvana. It’s a stake in the road that shows us where they want to get to – I’m not sure they are able to get there in one release.”

 
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Posted by on June 17, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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