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Samsung complaints “Apple’s new iPhone 5 violates its patents”

Newest Apple smartphone will be drawn into legal battle in California courts

Apple’s new iPhone 5 has been drawn into the patent battle under way between the company and Samsung in US courts.

 

Samsung Electronics announced on Sept. 20 that it submitted a document to the San Jose Divisional Office of the California Northern District Court the previous day stating that it considers the new model to violate its own patents and plans to add it to its previously filed suit.

As a next step, it plans to present a document detailing the specific patent infringements after examining the detailed product specifications and services.

The previous suit the company referred to was filed in April over the iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, the third generation iPad, and the iPad2. Samsung Electronics is claiming that Apple products and services violated two standard patents and six commercial patents that it owns. But since the iPhone 5 has yet to have an official release, it is still unknown just which of the eight patents Samsung believes the product violated. What is known is that it does not include Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology, which was the focus of particular industry attention among the eight patents at issue in the suit.

An official with the company called the decision “inevitable.”

 

“We prefer market competition based on innovation to lawsuits, but we made the decision that we had to respond in some way to protect continued innovations and intellectual property rights at a time when Apple is limiting market competition with lawsuits,” the official said.

 

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Windows Redesign A Problem For Microsoft Users

As Microsoft Corp prepares to show the world what its new Windows 8 can do on the next generation of high-powered tablets, initial reviews of the new operating system on existing hardware underscore the challenges the company faces with the radical redesign of its flagship product.

The world’s largest software company says millions of people are already using a downloaded pre-release version of Windows 8 on PCs, laptops and touch-devices ahead of its full introduction this autumn. At a media event in Los Angeles on Monday, the company is expected to discuss its plans to take on Apple Inc’s all-conquering iPad this holiday shopping season.

So far, most reviewers have praised the look and feel of the touch-friendly “Metro” style of Windows 8, which is based on colorful squares, or “tiles,” that depict applications such as email, and update in real time. But they have also stressed how difficult it will be for users to move away from what they know and trust.

“It’s a bit of a struggle for people who are deliberately oriented on a PC, that are used to a mouse feel,” said former Microsoft strategist Al Hilwa.

Now an analyst at tech research firm IDC, Hilwa has been trying out the latest demo release for two weeks. “Without a touchscreen, I struggled with a mouse to do certain things,” he said.

The new Metro interface only runs programs written for it, so users have to switch back to the traditional desktop to do certain tasks, like listening to music on Apple’s iTunes.

“The thing that really infuriates me is that it seems like Metro apps, and apps running in the normal desktop don’t have any knowledge of each other, ” said Forrester Research analyst David Johnson. “There’s no easy way to navigate between them, and I’m not quite sure why that is.”

The latest test version is not yet finished software. And outside of a few industry testers, no one has tried out Windows 8 on a tablet powered by ultra-efficient ARM Holdings chips, which is the closest Microsoft will come to challenging the iPad.

Microsoft is expected to say more about that on Monday, and there is talk that it might introduce a tablet under its own brand name. The company declined to comment on the reaction to the new system and its plans for the Monday event.

Nevertheless, Microsoft has not persuaded some of its most loyal users just yet.

“Right now, I’m not sold,” said analyst Michael Cherry of Directions on Microsoft, an independent research firm that focuses on the tech giant.

Cherry said he had persevered with Windows 8 for a few days, but had problems setting up email on his test machine. “I can’t rely on it as a production tool,” he said. “I can’t switch over yet. At this point, I should be able to leave Windows 7 behind.”

A former Microsoft program manager, Cherry worries that the initial complexity of the new system will prevent it from being an instant hit, like its predecessor, Windows 7.

“If a guy who has used Windows since Windows 1.0 can’t figure it out, then I’m going to guess there are other people out there who aren’t going to figure it out,” he said. “We won’t see line-ups at Best Buy at midnight. I’d love to see that, but it’s just not there.”

Mainstream tech reviewers like the Wall Street Journal’s Walt Mossberg or the New York Times’ David Pogue have not yet weighed in on the third and latest “preview” of Windows 8, which became publicly available online on May 31.

The smattering of reviews on tech-centric blogs have generally praised the new look of Windows 8, but almost every one has stressed how difficult users will find the switch.

“I’ve felt almost totally at sea – confused, paralyzed, angry, and ultimately resigned to the pain of having to alter the way I do most of my work,” wrote Farhad Manjoo, technology columnist at online journal Slate, even as he acknowledged that there is a lot to love about Windows 8.

GeekWire — Microsoft’s hometown technology news website in Seattle — was no kinder, featuring a video of one reader’s father, completely stumped by how to get back to the Start menu. ( http://www.geekwire.com/2012/real-user-windows-8-they-drive-mac/ )

“Bottom line, I’ve spent the past day feeling lost, and a little grumpy,” wrote GeekWire’s Todd Bishop, who has followed the software company as a reporter for more than a decade.

“Microsoft likes to use the words ‘fast and fluid’ to describe Windows 8, but two other words keep popping to my mind: ‘New Coke,'” wrote Bishop, referring to Coca-Cola Co’s short-lived attempt to reinvent its core product in the 1980s.

Gizmodo reviewer Mat Honan praised Windows 8’s “subtle elegance” and said the Metro apps were better and easier to navigate than the last test version, but added there was nothing that “bowls you over.”

ZDNet reviewer Ed Bott, a previous skeptic of Windows 8, liked the “rich and polished collection of Metro-style apps,” and was the only high-profile reviewer with a wholly positive reaction.

To be sure, any great change to a system used by more than 1 billion people every day is bound to meet with resistance.

Microsoft’s Vista operating system got off to a terrible start in early 2007 due to its heavy memory demands and finicky security settings, but recovered somewhat in later updates. Almost three years later, its successor, Windows 7, became the company’s fastest-selling system to date, and has now racked up more than 500 million sales.

But Apple’s intuitive iOS mobile system has raised expectations, both for aesthetics and ease of use.

“I would not be able to give my mother – who is 76 – Windows 8 and expect her to be productive with it,” said Forrester’s Johnson. “But I’m also not sure that somebody in their 30s, or even 20s, wouldn’t be confused initially by the Metro interface either.”

Individual consumers and potential iPad buyers, rather than corporate customers, are the primary target for the Windows 8. Many big companies are still in the process of spending millions of dollars upgrading to Windows 7.

The success of the software will depend in part on the quality and price of machines running Windows 8, which is in the hands of PC makers such as Hewlett-Packard Co, Samsung Electronics, Lenovo Group and Acer Inc .

But even if the machines are slick, Microsoft’s online Windows Store is still no match for Apple’s App Store, and will probably take several years to build momentum, which in turn removes incentives to buy tablets running the new Windows.

“I really want to use Windows 8,” said Cherry of Directions on Microsoft. “But I’m not sure they’ve gotten to nirvana. It’s a stake in the road that shows us where they want to get to – I’m not sure they are able to get there in one release.”

 
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Posted by on June 17, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Sony Puts a Phone Display on Your Wrist

You know how people who rudely check their phones every 42 seconds can drive you completely bonkers?

Thanks to Sony they won’t do that any longer. Instead they will drive you bonkers by checking their watches.

Sony’s SmartWatch links with a phone to show text messages, e-mails,  photos and updates from your social networks on its face.

The watch can also be used to hit redial and control other functions, like the smartphone’s music player.

Oh — it also tells time.

There is clearly interest in this sort of device. A proposal to produce a phone-connected watch called the Pebble didn’t raise the sought-after funding of $100,000 when it was posted on Kickstarter, the Web site that seeks investors for creative projects — it raised more than $10 million. The creators are indebted to deliver about 60,000 watches to investors.

The Sony version lacks the style of the Pebble. It is a simple 1.4-inch square with a glassy face and polished silver-colored bezel. The display screen measures 1.3 inches diagonally, well shy of an inch square, yet it’s oddly easy to read, except outdoors, where the sun can wash out the display.

Sony Xperia phones come ready to sync with the watch (natch), but because the watch uses the Android platform, some other Android phones can connect once the LiveWare app is downloaded. But it doesn’t connect with as many as I would like — not one of the five I had on hand made the list of about 20 phones (other than Sony’s) that link with the device. With the right phone and software the SmartWatch pairs much like any Bluetooth device.

When a call or message comes in, the phone vibrates and wakes the screen, which stays lit for 15 seconds. Incoming calls showed the number and name if the person was in my contact list. Messages just came in as a blue icon, though.

The watch requires a phone to work. On the occasions when I lost a connection, even the clock went to 00:00. I didn’t get anything close to the advertised four-day running time for the watch’s battery, but it didn’t matter; the Xperia Ray phone it connected to conked out long before the watch.

So far there aren’t a lot of apps available for the phone and to find them you are consigned to the fifth circle of Google Play (the torture formerly known as the Android Market). Look under “Sony Smart Extras” to improve your results. I found about 20 apps.

The watch has a clip on the back, much like an older iPod Shuffle, so it can be clipped to clothing or to the interchangeable watchbands Sony sells for $20 each. The watch lists for $150 from Sony, which plans to ship it this week.

 
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Posted by on May 19, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Ever heard of Gentoo Linux

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Gentoo is a free operating system based on either Linux or FreeBSD that can be automatically optimized and customized for just about any application or need. Extreme configurability, performance and a top-notch user and developer community are all hallmarks of the Gentoo experience.

Thanks to a technology called Portage, Gentoo can become an ideal secure server, development workstation, professional desktop, gaming system, embedded solution or something else — whatever you need it to be. Because of its near-unlimited adaptability, we call Gentoo a metadistribution.

Of course, Gentoo is more than just the software it provides. It is a community built around a distribution which is driven by more than 300 developers and thousands of users. The distribution project provides the means for the users to enjoy Gentoo: documentation, infrastructure (mailinglists, site, forums …), release engineering, software porting, quality assurance, security followup, hardening and more.

Get if from http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/where.xml

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The development project and its products are named after the fastest-swimming penguin, the Gentoo, to reflect the potential speed improvements of machine-specific optimization. Gentoo package management is designed to be modular, portable, easy to maintain, flexible, and optimized for the user’s machine. Gentoo describes itself as a meta-distribution, “because of its near-unlimited adaptability”, in that the majority of users have configurations and sets of installed programs which are unique to themselves

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Nokia unveils 41 megapixel phone

Nokia has unveiled a 41 megapixel camera-phone – designed so phone users can ‘zoom in’ without a bulky lens.

The 41-megapixel sensor is around three times more powerful than the ones in any existing handsets.

A Nokia executive says, ‘It shows what we can do.’

The phone will be launched in May and cost 480 Euros.

Nokia says the technology is designed so users can zoom in quickly and easily without losing picture quality.

Most smartphones use digital zoom functions where the picture quality drops when users ‘zoom in’ – in practice, the zoom functions are rarely used.

PureView’s huge 41-megapixel sensor lets users zoom in up to six times simply by ‘selecting’ an area – and because of the super-high resolution of the PureView, images still come out at five megapixels, the same as many normal smartphone cameras.

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With video, users can zoom in up to four times and still shoot in 1080p Full HD.

‘When you zoom with the Nokia 808 PureView, in effect you are just selecting the relevant area of the sensor,’ says the Finnish company. ‘With no zoom, you simply use the full area of the sensor.’

The phone is bulkier than normal camera phones, according to reports from Barcelona’s Mobile World Congress, where it was unveiled, but even on full resolution, it shoots instantly.

 

The phone has been in development for years, Nokia said, and produces pictures that can be blown up to ‘poster size’.

Tech site Pocket-Lint said, ‘What it shows us though is that Nokia can create amazing technology in a device that is small and compact – relatively speaking.

‘We’re also told it will come to other handsets in the future. The reason you don’t want it is that, beside the amazing camera tech, it runs the company’s Symbian operating system, which is basically winding down.’

 
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Posted by on February 28, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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msnNOW New Social News Aggregator by Microsoft

Microsoft  has launched a new online service called msnNOW, which is a social media powered trends and news aggregator. It analyzes data from Twitter, Facebook, Bing and some other services to identify, curate and display the latest news stories and trends. It is like a mash-up of Google News and Google Trends, but instead of search, it is powered by social data .

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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